Computer Sciences

Getting around the smart city

Smart cities will not be truly smart until they have sustainable transport systems. New work published in the International Journal of Shipping and Transport Logistics has used fuzzy logic to look at the options.

Robotics

These robots can move your couch

To train robots how to work independently but cooperatively, researchers at the University of Cincinnati gave them a relatable task: Move a couch.

Electronics & Semiconductors

Imec introduces 2-D materials in the logic device scaling roadmap

The continual scaling of Si-based transistors is challenged by short channel effects that limit further gate length scaling. Field-effect transistors (FETs) with semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (MX2, such ...

Computer Sciences

EPFL lab develops method for designing lower-power circuits

An Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) lab has come up with a new type of logic diagram and related optimization methods, that can be used to design computer chips with a nearly 20% gain in energy efficiency, ...

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Logic

In philosophy, Logic (from the Greek λογική logikē) is the formal systematic study of the principles of valid inference and correct reasoning. Logic is used in most intellectual activities, but is studied primarily in the disciplines of philosophy, mathematics, semantics, and computer science. It examines general forms which arguments may take, which forms are valid, and which are fallacies. In philosophy, the study of logic is applied in most major areas: ontology, epistemology, ethics, metaphysics. In mathematics, it is the study of valid inferences within some formal language. Logic is also studied in argumentation theory.

Logic was studied in several ancient civilizations, including the Indian subcontinent, China and Greece. Logic was established as a discipline by Aristotle, who gave it a fundamental place in philosophy. The study of logic was part of the classical trivium, which also included grammar and rhetoric.

Logic is often divided into two parts, inductive reasoning and deductive reasoning.

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