Machine Learning & AI

Bach and Adele: Knock yourselves out on MuseNet

OpenAI is introducing a musical MuseNet, the music-generating AI that was in the news earlier this week. Some AI watchers were calling the music OpenAI just unveiled as amazing.

Machine Learning & AI

Will artificial intelligence be the future of music?

They may never be able to fill a stadium for a rock concert, but computers are making inroads in the music industry, capable of producing songs—and convincingly so—as illustrated at the South by Southwest festival in ...

Engineering

Miniaturised pipe organ could aid medical imaging

A miniaturised version of a musical instrument that could be used to improve the quality of medical images has been manufactured by researchers at the University of Strathclyde.

Internet

Deezer explores AI system for music that matches mood

Deezer is a France-based personal music streaming service. They are ambitious in securing a place in the frontlines of the streaming business. Signs are that they are working on technology that can make a difference for service-seeking ...

Computer Sciences

Using machine learning for music knowledge discovery

Researchers at the University of Pompeu Fabra, Cardiff University and the Technical University of Madrid used machine-learning algorithms to discover new things about the history of music.

Computer Sciences

An AI system for editing music in videos

Amateur and professional musicians alike may spend hours pouring over YouTube clips to figure out exactly how to play certain parts of their favorite songs. But what if there were a way to play a video and isolate the only ...

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Music

Music is an art form whose medium is sound. Common elements of music are pitch (which governs melody and harmony), rhythm (and its associated concepts tempo, meter, and articulation), dynamics, and the sonic qualities of timbre and texture. The word derives from Greek μουσική (mousike), "(art) of the Muses".

The creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of music vary according to culture and social context. Music ranges from strictly organized compositions (and their recreation in performance), through improvisational music to aleatoric forms. Music can be divided into genres and subgenres, although the dividing lines and relationships between music genres are often subtle, sometimes open to individual interpretation, and occasionally controversial. Within "the arts", music may be classified as a performing art, a fine art, and auditory art.

To many people in many cultures music is an important part of their way of life. Greek philosophers and ancient Indian philosophers defined music as tones ordered horizontally as melodies and vertically as harmonies. Common sayings such as "the harmony of the spheres" and "it is music to my ears" point to the notion that music is often ordered and pleasant to listen to. However, 20th-century composer John Cage thought that any sound can be music, saying, for example, "There is no noise, only sound." According to musicologist Jean-Jacques Nattiez, "the border between music and noise is always culturally defined—which implies that, even within a single society, this border does not always pass through the same place; in short, there is rarely a consensus.... By all accounts there is no single and intercultural universal concept defining what music might be, except that it is 'sound through time'."

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA