Engineering

A new way to make electricity using ocean waves

A team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed a new way to generate electricity using ocean waves. In their paper published in the journal One Earth, the group describes how their new device works ...

Energy & Green Tech

Biden plans floating platforms to expand offshore wind power

The Biden administration on Thursday announced plans to develop floating platforms in the deep ocean for wind towers that could power millions of homes and vastly expand offshore wind in the United States.

Energy & Green Tech

New energy harvesters show potential that fits like a glove

A group of University of Texas at Dallas researchers and their colleagues have made significant improvements to energy-harvesting yarns they invented called twistrons, which are made from carbon nanotubes and produce electricity ...

Engineering

Human-occupied submersible Alvin makes historic dive

Today, the human-occupied submersible Alvin made history when it successfully reached a depth of 6,453 meters (nearly 4 miles) in the Puerto Rico Trench, north of San Juan, P.R. This is the deepest dive ever in the 58-year ...

Robotics

Observing Arctic marine life, from the seabed to space

In late May, NTNU researchers and students used a small satellite, an unmanned aerial vehicle, two unmanned boats and subsea robots to survey the same area simultaneously. This is an approach called an observational pyramid.

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Ocean

An ocean (from Greek Ωκεανός, Okeanos (Oceanus)) is a major body of saline water, and a principal component of the hydrosphere. Approximately 71% of the Earth's surface (an area of some 361 million square kilometers) is covered by ocean, a continuous body of water that is customarily divided into several principal oceans and smaller seas. More than half of this area is over 3,000 meters (9,800 ft) deep. Average oceanic salinity is around 35 parts per thousand (ppt) (3.5%), and nearly all seawater has a salinity in the range of 30 to 38 ppt.

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