Robotics

Control of snake-like robots for high mobility and dexterity

Snake-like articulated mobile robots can enter narrow spaces and climb obstacles using their long and thin bodies, and are effective for inspection of narrow spaces and search-and-rescue operation on disaster sites. However, ...

Energy & Green Tech

Energizing buildings

A solar façade developed at ETH Zurich combines electricity production with intelligent shading to achieve optimal energy balance.

Business

Is Boeing too big to fail?

The grounding of the 737 MAX for more than four months after two deadly accidents has tarnished Boeing's reputation, but it still has the confidence of US policymakers.

Energy & Green Tech

Which climates are best for passive cooling technologies?

A group of University of California, San Diego researchers set out to gain a better understanding of the thermal balance of power plants and surfaces, like heliostat mirrors or solar panels, when exposed to both solar (shortwave) ...

Robotics

Robotic bees are joining the International Space Station

"There are some things only humans can do in space. The rest can be left to robots." The NASA team is showcasing hw to put that simple observation into interesting practice with their development of Astrobees.

Robotics

No worries, go catch your flight, a robot is parking your car

Many air travelers, whether frequent or infrequent, find that boarding, checking luggage and clearing documents at busy airports are not as stressful as one more experience—trying to find a parking space.

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Space

Space is the boundless, three-dimensional extent in which objects and events occur and have relative position and direction. Physical space is often conceived in three linear dimensions, although modern physicists usually consider it, with time, to be part of the boundless four-dimensional continuum known as spacetime. In mathematics spaces with different numbers of dimensions and with different underlying structures can be examined. The concept of space is considered to be of fundamental importance to an understanding of the universe although disagreement continues between philosophers over whether it is itself an entity, a relationship between entities, or part of a conceptual framework.

Many of the philosophical questions arose in the 17th century, during the early development of classical mechanics. In Isaac Newton's view, space was absolute - in the sense that it existed permanently and independently of whether there were any matter in the space. Other natural philosophers, notably Gottfried Leibniz, thought instead that space was a collection of relations between objects, given by their distance and direction from one another. In the 18th century, Immanuel Kant described space and time as elements of a systematic framework which humans use to structure their experience.

In the 19th and 20th centuries mathematicians began to examine non-Euclidean geometries, in which space can be said to be curved, rather than flat. According to Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity, space around gravitational fields deviates from Euclidean space. Experimental tests of general relativity have confirmed that non-Euclidean space provides a better model for explaining the existing laws of mechanics and optics.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA