Hi Tech & Innovation

Patent talk: Exploring self-driving car with device as steering wheel

Ford received a patent from the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The patent is called "Non-Autonomous Steering Modes," and is described as a car capable of receiving a request to steer, and react accordingly.

Hi Tech & Innovation

Hi, steering wheel? Jaguar's thinking caps call it the Sayer

(Tech Xplore)—Chew on this. Forget about turning for news about fresh features in your self-driving car of tomorrow. Jaguar wants to turn everything on its head. Car ownership, like car driving, is up for fresh air thinking.

Hi Tech & Innovation

BMW Group to show car tech detecting hand movements

The many advances of networking technologies linking driver, car and environment will be in evidence at the CES show in Vegas. BMW like other car companies are seriously looking for special footing in the marketplace with ...

Steering wheel

A steering wheel (also called a driving wheel or hand wheel[citation needed]) is a type of steering control in vehicles and vessels (ships and boats).

Steering wheels are used in most modern land vehicles, including all mass-production automobiles as well as light and heavy trucks. The steering wheel is the part of the steering system that is manipulated by the driver; the rest of the steering system responds to such driver inputs. This can be through direct mechanical contact as in recirculating ball or rack and pinion steering gears, without or with the assistance of hydraulic power steering, HPS, or as in some modern production cars with the assistance of computer controlled motors, known as Electric Power Steering. With the introduction of federal vehicle regulation in the United States in 1968, FMVSS 114 required the impairment of steering wheel rotation, to hinder motor vehicle theft; in most vehicles this is accomplished when the ignition key is removed from the ignition lock.

Remote car audio controls are often included on the steering wheels of newer vehicles.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA