Microsoft event to talk about fresh-start Windows 9

Windows 8
Windows 8 screenshot

Microsoft is about to introduce Windows 9 next week at an event, ahead of its widespread release in 2015. The project for the next Windows operating system has been given the internal code name as Threshold.

Microsoft watchers have noted that the next OS could indeed be a needed threshold move to win back business users who were put off by Windows 8 because of its tiles-based interface instead of the start menu they had relied on in Windows 7 and older Windows versions. The frustration was palpable last year, and one example was a posting in Micro Doctor, a technology solutions company, headlined "Windows 8.1 is a huge disappointment." Mark Richmond, CEO, said, "If Microsoft does not bring back the Start Menu, I predict Windows 8 will become the second biggest Operating System blunder since Microsoft Vista. Every PC we sell today has Windows 7 Pro installed or downgraded from Windows 8. Perhaps they need to Spin off Windows 8 Touch and Bring out a Windows 9 Corporate Edition with the start menu again."

There are hopes and expectations for a revamped treatment of a Start Menu that looks more familiar to Windows users before the onset of tiles. In addition have been discussions about what Windows 9 will be called—if not Windows 9. Reports indicate Microsoft might unveil a new name for the software. If so, the name change would be "symbolic of a new direction for Microsoft moving away from an aggressive focus on Windows and PCs," said a report in The Guardian by Samuel Gibbs and agencies. The report quoted Daniel Ives, an analyst at investment bank FBR Capital Markets, who said Windows 9 was a potentially game-changing product release for Microsoft.

Microsoft had sent out invitations to journalists to "hear about what's next for Windows and the Enterprise" on Tuesday in San Francisco, reported InfoWorld. Woody Leonhard, senior contributing editor, said in InfoWorld that next week's event, however, should not be expected to provide finer details, but instead to provide a preview to "show off the plumbing and the broad strokes of Windows' future."

Reflecting on possible release dates for Windows 9, Redmond Magazine reasoned in August that a release in spring next year would reflect timing with the next Build event for developers. "Microsoft has previously used its Build events as a main venue to show off its next Windows releases." Another date for the release being eyed is the week of May 4, 2015, which coincides with an event titled "Unified Microsoft Commercial Technology Event," thought to serve as a replacement for TechEd, SharePoint Conference, Lync Conference, Exchange Conference and Project Conference events.


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Sep 26, 2014
Windows 7 is still hopelessly broken.. Audio's useless with a terrible laggy mixer (still no ASIO!?) and no direct control of HW audio sources (per XP et al), broken Windows Display Driver Model that precludes span modes (per XP et al), broken filing system that thinks all shortcuts with the same filename are pointing to the same file, and thinks whatever drive the OS is installed on MUST be C:, even if it's not (resulting in inconsistent designations across multi-boot systems)...

I could go on, but there's the three main things i need an OS to be able to handle; audio, video and files, and which WIndows 7 cannot. Hence i still have to use XP.

It beggars belief MS could be so hopelessly incompetent.

Please, MS, bring back XP, just with updated DirectX and memory handling? That's all i want for xmas..

Sep 26, 2014
Windows 8 and 8.1 is WORSE than Windows Vista. It is THE biggest blunder by Microsoft. I'm an IT expert and I still can't adjust to the awkward Windows 8 tile interface. Bring back the normal desktop and mouse focus for desktop PCs!

Sep 27, 2014
after buying a new quad-core laptop with Win8.1, I can now honestly say:

its crap

i scrapped it for Ubuntu. My 7 year old laptop loaded with Ubuntu outperformed my Quad core, so I just loaded Linux onto the quad core...
it's better, faster, cleaner, less problematic, works everything that i want or need, does not hang up, does not take hours to "update", nor does it force me off-line during updates.

upgrade to Linux.
don't look back. I didn't

Sep 27, 2014
after buying a new quad-core laptop with Win8.1, I can now honestly say:

its crap

i scrapped it for Ubuntu. My 7 year old laptop loaded with Ubuntu outperformed my Quad core, so I just loaded Linux onto the quad core...
it's better, faster, cleaner, less problematic, works everything that i want or need, does not hang up, does not take hours to "update", nor does it force me off-line during updates.

upgrade to Linux.
don't look back. I didn't

Bash that Linux

Sep 27, 2014
Don't know why Microsoft does this to us. Frustrating!


Same as the reason they do anything, to get at your $$.

Sep 27, 2014
It seems people wants to hate on Windows 8 because it lacks a cluttered mess that is the start menu. Either this is a psychological issue where we want to hate something different or a lack of intelligence. It if really takes more than two days to figure out how to use it, maybe you're not smart enough to own a computer, huh? That's a pretty low bar to jump over.


Perhaps people are just sick of the upgrade hamster wheel. These days, new does not mean better.

Sep 27, 2014
I don't mind the new interface, or even the gratuitous changing of keyboard shortcuts. I don't even particularly mind all of the cosmetic shortcomings of Windows 8.

What I mind is the incredible amount of FUNDAMENTAL DESIGN FLAWS that make it completely unmanageable in many fields. I mind the fact that they 'optimized' the booting up of Win 8 for solid-state drives (like mine), yet forgot to fix the minor problem that you can now no longer access the system setup or boot sector if the OS has a problem loading (which, after updates, it very frequently does) because it passes that stage quicker than it can register a keystroke. I also mind that the system restore function, which you are then forced to rely on, is flawed on more levels than I have room to describe here. And I mind how you basically have to choose between fully automated updates that you cannot delay when they come at an inopportune moment (bye bye "shut down without updating") or getting no heads-up about updates at all.

Sep 27, 2014
IMHO one of the most frustrating aspects with the MS tile interface is that they, by replacing icons with tiles /but actually with whatever else/ they replaced what was essentially signs, symbols, with big flat areas capable to carry just about zero information /or just too much, unnecessarily much, of it in the case of a picture/. The symbol was a main way to carry information /and still is for humans/ for centuries for a reason - it carries just enough /shape and/or color/ to be easily, fast distinguishable from the other symbols and is just large enough for the eye to be capable of immediately processing that information and it occupies the minimal amount of space, necessary for that. By replacing symbols with tiles they blundered the interface and the space it occupies /while they thought they improve it and make it more informative/.

Sep 27, 2014
Might be interesting to see to what degree Microsoft wants to accept the changing way people use computing devices. Their main thrust, of course, is keeping their stakeholders happy, not keeping their customers happy. For the past few cycles, they have had this grandiose notion of corralling users into a Microsoft controlled, largely Microsoft populated world. Towards that end, they've abused their desktop users terribly.

Their control of some particular operating system is becoming increasing irrelevant. All their competition (Apple, open source) seek no revenue from operating systems; Microsoft is competing against free.

Sep 27, 2014
Windows 7 is still hopelessly broken.. Audio's useless with a terrible laggy mixer (still no ASIO!?)...


Device drivers are the responsibility of the hardware manufacturer, not Microsoft. I suggest you obtain the latest driver from the manufacturer's website, or use third party ASIO drivers, such as ASIO4ALL.

I'm talking about the windows mixer, not the device drivers. W7 mixes digital audio from multiple sources into a single stream, so that it can enable independent volume controls for every running application.

None of the parameters of this mixer sample are available to the user, hence its latency cannot be reduced.

For example, connect an audio source to your audio card's Line-In, and monitor the signal both from within Windows via headphones or speakers, and at the same time, also directly from the source. There's a significant delay (+10ms) from the W7 mixer because the signal has to be processed. XP's simpler pass-through mixer doesn't suffer this problem.

Sep 27, 2014
after buying a new quad-core laptop with Win8.1, I can now honestly say:

its crap

i scrapped it for Ubuntu. My 7 year old laptop loaded with Ubuntu outperformed my Quad core, so I just loaded Linux onto the quad core...
it's better, faster, cleaner, less problematic, works everything that i want or need, does not hang up, does not take hours to "update", nor does it force me off-line during updates.

upgrade to Linux.
don't look back. I didn't

Bash that Linux

#chsh tcsh
FIXED

Sep 27, 2014
Windows 7 was a huge step forward. Windows 8 not so much. Microsoft is now listening to the market instead of telling the market it want. I love Windows 7. I'm looking forward to Windows 9. When all is said and done Windows is a major player and brings much to the table that everyone takes for granted. I started with it, changed and went another direction, but I always came back to Windows.

Sep 27, 2014
@MrVibrating
I can attest to your audio issues... I'm a guitarist and I like(d) to record my own music but after upgrading, it literally put a damper on that, and that was years ago. The delay is unbearable when trying to record multiple tracks. Yes I can buy external hardware to circumvent this but I just haven't wanted to put in the time, money, and effort, and so I haven't. It's funny, I can trace the decline of my music output with upgrading. Oh well, now I'm a cell physiologist... who has time for such things as recording music :(.

Sep 27, 2014
nobody here like zsh for shell and fluxbox (if you need a) gui? That's what I use unless I have a specific reason not to.

Sep 27, 2014
I find it to be a bit odd that the 'major flaw' reported here about Windows 8 is the tile user interface.

Yes, it's wretched. But the flaws in Windows 8 go much deeper. With every new version of Windows, Microsoft wrenches more control away from users. Just try to set folder, document or application properties within program folders and you'll see what I mean. In its guts, Microsoft continues to rely on code written in the 1980s (paginated memory), which results in a sluggish performance. It provides an opaque, proprietary encryption scheme which can't be probed for vulnerabilities by the public. Network diagnostics are horribly slow. Applications standards are loose, apps can and do crash regularly - even network browsers, including Microsoft's own. Microsoft's companion browser has no option for blocking ads (privacy vulnerability!) and is slower than the competition. Constant nagging to switch to Bing and Internet Explorer is annoying. And that's only a taste. Horrible.

Sep 27, 2014
nobody here like zsh for shell and fluxbox (if you need a) gui? That's what I use unless I have a specific reason not to.
Most people prefer monolithic bloatware overloaded with features they will never use, so they can whine when a feature nobody ever used is found to be a security hole. People have an innate need to whine and cry. They just learn how to conceal the pretext better as adults

Then Bill Gates proves once again that greed runs through corporations and life is unfair. The victim can then justify stealing pens from the office or charge unnecessary overdrafts from the customer's bank account etc.

Sep 27, 2014
Hmm. Took me a long, hard week to sanitise Win 8.1 back to a 'desktop' environment, so I don't see those pesky 'metro' blocks more than once or twice a week...

Won't use IE, gone to Chrome in self defence.

Gone to Mozilla T'Bird, ditto.

Have Open Office instead of Office, but generally work in Notepad because TXT files are almost unbreakable, and about as minimal as you can get.

Big pain with my Win 8.1, forced on me when my ex-CAD, twin-screen XP system died in a storm, is the lack of support for legacy 16-bit drivers. I now have a heap of stuff that will not work, either because Windows flatly refuses to load the setup, or cannot run the TWAIN interface...

FWIW, I'd put up with those quirks if Microsoft would fix the 'folder' image back to 'full on', how it used to be, rather than have just an edge of the image peeking out from that stupid beige 'folder' thing...

Sep 27, 2014
@MrVibrating...

I could go on, but there's the three main things i need an OS to be able to handle; audio, video and files, and which WIndows 7 cannot. Hence i still have to use XP.


Wouldn't you'd be better off moving to OS X and be done with this annoyance?

Sep 27, 2014
...upgrade to Linux.
don't look back. I didn't


I use Linux regularly, but when I have to do real work I have to switch over to Windows for a bit to do my work, and then I can switch back. I'd love not to look back but it isn't feasible yet. It is less so now that a couple 16-bit programs I still need to use from time to time (these will never receive updates or upgrades) will no longer run on 64-bit Linux at all without tweaking and breaking security in the kernel. Tried to edit a Word document using LibreOffice and it looked gawdawful as soon as I opened it. I fixed it all up to pass on to another person and it looked like absolute crap again. Productivity loss.

So, unfortunately, for now I still am stuck with Windows. There are a number of things that Linux just cannot do that Windows can flawlessly for me. Don't even get me started on drivers. I still use Linux and hold out hope, though. One day, maybe twenty more years from now, Linux will be ready for prime time.

Sep 27, 2014
...
i scrapped it for Ubuntu....
it's better, faster, cleaner, less problematic, works everything that i want or need, does not hang up...


Definitely not my experience with Ubuntu. Suspend to RAM and Hibernation still are epic fails, and this is on a system that was certified for Ubuntu! If I do not make a custom xorg.conf file to sort things out Ubuntu still cannot tell which monitor is primary on either Intel or AMD. I also had to watch it because after some updates my xorg.conf file got renamed or deleted every once in a while, putting the logon screen on the wrong monitor. And then there was the little problem of several data partitions becoming corrupted as a result of Ubuntu file handling on 12.04 LTS. Luckily I had system images and backups in addition. Using 14.04 now and features that work flawlessly in Windows still fail in Ubuntu, and this on a certified system with no flaws in hardware! And, so it goes...

Sep 28, 2014
It's also apparently impossible to connect to an ad-hoc wireless network in Windows 8. It refuses to show any computer-to-computer networks, although it allows you to create one, although any ad-hoc network you create is again automatically forgotten once the connection goes down. This is frankly annoying, because in order to have a wireless printer, you also need a wlan router to establish a network. I can't just turn my own computer into a wifi hotspot.

I also can't use another computer to share internet to a win8 machine over wlan because again it refuses to aknowledge that the network exists, and even if you manually create a "new" network using the same SSID, it still treats it as an "untrusted" network with no obvious way to change the behaviour, so you can't get an IP address by DHCP from the other machine and you don't get internet even if you manually configure your IP.

It's a bloody mess. They just assume you have a wifi-router and that's that. Anything else is Verboten.

Sep 28, 2014
The problem with the wifi printer and internet sharing actually exists on Win7 as well, where they still have ad-hoc networks, but the system refuses to save your network key or auto-connect to the network. You can hack it so that it remembers the password, but you can't get it to auto-connect properly, so you have to manually start the network every time.


Sep 28, 2014
"It's also apparently impossible to connect to an ad-hoc wireless network in Windows 8. It refuses to show any computer-to-computer networks, although it allows you to create one, although any ad-hoc network you create is again automatically forgotten once the connection goes down."

I do not see these same kinds of problems on my ad hoc wireless network, with or without a router. I also have no problems with Internet connection sharing (works best when you have two real network devices although it can be done virtually with VMWare and such). Curious. Make sure peer-to-peer networking is enabled. Try also assigning a static, private IP address to your wireless printer, create an ad hoc network connection, create a homegroup, and also share the wireless printer on one of the computers, typically the one first of the homegroup. Join each additional computer you want to use on your ad hoc network to that homegroup. Make any difference for you?

Sep 29, 2014
since later Os, Win 8 is an impovement but still lacking important issues. With start menu there are solutions like start menu x ,for example which i find more organizing than any previous ms start menu. though its important to integrate into the next system a practical usable start menu which i think for a large software corporation can be achieved at a satisfactory level. personally i have gave up using MS Ofiice and i am using Open Office. since customer feedback should be most important to them , at least they can use this info to make something Users will be satisfied.. but to build a better platform in my opinion should take a step further not building and enhancing the same things. for example the ability of the Os to self check and to self correct its state .. you dont need troubleshooters when a problem appears (and to not be able to help you!) .. for me the next move should be seriously consider to make a more "smart" system , but this is a major upgrade.

Sep 29, 2014
I do not see these same kinds of problems on my ad hoc wireless network, with or without a router.


There is no ad-hoc network with a router. You're probably confusing something here. Windows 8.1 (non-pro) simply will not show ad-hoc networks created by other devices in its network picker.

See for reference:
http://social.tec...tworking


Sep 29, 2014
Definitely not my experience with Ubuntu
@Skepticus Rex
Wow.... I am a little surprised.
I slapped Ubuntu onto my oldest laptop when Windows crashed for the umpteenth time and I had enough... I was just going to run it from disk, but I realised that it was easier to just slap another partition and run a separate OS... and from then on I never used windows again on it... even Office
And I never had the Office transfer problems either... I was running Office Pro 95 (? i think) though. Might have had something to do with it

about your home network
on my ad hoc wireless network
are you running an always on PC and using it as a central unit that hooks your printer etc up to the net?

Sep 30, 2014
Eikka,
No, I am not confusing anything. You can set up an ad hoc wireless network with a router present. You just ignore the router by having differing channels and manually not using the router's channel. I've done it many times and it can be done. Anyway, there is no GUI in Windows 8.1 to set up an Ad Hoc wireless network. You have to use netsh and you can script. Your wireless card also must support Hosted networking. Run (without quotes) "netsh wlan show drivers" and see if "Hosted network supported" says "yes." If not, you'll need to upgrade drivers and/or hardware. If you don't have netsh, you're out of luck or have to go third-party. Configuring needs a few additional netsh commands. You can Google how to do it. By the way, I just about always use Pro versions or better of Windows (even at home) so I cannot speak to home editions. More bells and whistles. :-)

Oct 01, 2014
"about your home network
on my ad hoc wireless network
are you running an always on PC and using it as a central unit that hooks your printer etc up to the net?"

I've done it that way but as of this moment I no longer am doing so. I used to have to share a LaserJet 4L printer (with parallel port; network option died and I couldn't find a working replacement) this way. I'd use that computer for ICS, too, when needed. The whole house is on Gigabit, with attached wireless routing for wireless devices, now. No need for Ad hoc networking at the moment. But, when a piece of networking hardware died, and before I could obtain a replacement, I had to do it again for a couple weeks with the ad hoc thing. Worked fine for me even with Windows 8.1 Pro.

Oct 01, 2014
But, when a piece of networking hardware died, and before I could obtain a replacement, I had to do it again for a couple weeks with the ad hoc thing. Worked fine for me even with Windows 8.1 Pro.
@Skepticus Rex
by using the method you describe above in your post to Eikka?

and you always use PRO editions, not home?

Interesting.
Thanks for the input... I will be looking into that re: networking per your post to Eikka
...I have a printer I am thinking about sharing and an old box that I have multiple OS's on for playing an old game that is in DOS 6 / Win 3.11


Oct 01, 2014
@Captain Stumpy

"@Skepticus Rex
by using the method you describe above in your post to Eikka?

and you always use PRO editions, not home?

Interesting.
Thanks for the input... I will be looking into that re: networking per your post to Eikka
...I have a printer I am thinking about sharing and an old box that I have multiple OS's on for playing an old game that is in DOS 6 / Win 3.11"

Yes, I always use PRO or better. If I buy a computer with a home edition on it I upgrade ASAP if I cannot buy the computer with a PRO edition or better. With Windows 7 I used Ultimate. Home editions are too limiting for my tastes and preferences. Yes, I used the method mentioned to Eikka. Had no choice if I wanted to have networking on several devices as there weren't enough Ethernet ports until I got the replacement hardware. So, had to enable wireless on the devices and go Ad Hoc for a bit. It is doable if your hardware supports it. That is why the command above. If hardware supports, it works.

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