Desolenator has tech for water independence, looks to 2015 (w/ Video)

Desolenator has tech for water independence, looks to 2015 (w/ Video)

(Phys.org) —What else is new: Earnest people who are aware of the difficulties very poor families face in many regions of the world wish for safe, cheap drinking water for everyone on the planet. The difference is that there is something new in a team who think that their Desolenator can actually deliver water for those in need.

"Today we estimate that there are over a billion people on the planet who don't have constant access to clean safe water. That's a billion too many." (Desolenator in a nutshell harnesses the power of the sun to convert seawater into drinking water.) The system purifies water from any source, including salt water. This is a solar-powered system. Desolenator will desalinate water at a lower cost per liter, they said, than any system at this scale available on the market today. But what about other drinking water and desalination technologies on the market? The Desolenator team said that existing solutions are not viable. CEO of Desolenator, William Janssen, said that "A massive 97 percent of the world's water is and our plan is to tap into this valuable and available resource to disrupt the global water crisis in an unprecedented way. The process is called desalination and today whilst 0.7 percent of the world's water comes from desalination, existing technology is expensive, inefficient and disproportionally drains 0.5 percent of the world's global energy supply."

They seek a way to transform sea water into drinking water in a sustainable way. The problem with large-scale desalination technologies is that the enormous plants require huge costs to set up and to run as well as vast amounts of energy powered by fossil fuels.

Matthew Peach, contributing editor of optics.org wrote about their system, and quoted Janssen in explaining just how it works: "What we have done is completely reverse-engineer the solar panel: we didn't cool it down; on the contrary, we insulated with double glazing and foam. So now the panel gets even hotter."

Through a combination of thermal, electrical and heat exchange, the result is pure clean drinking water through the power of the sun. Specifically, Desolenator maximizes the that hits the surface area of the system to boil water to get a yield over 15 liters of water per day. Solar panels typically convert only about 15 to 18 percent of the solar radiation that hits them into energy, but Desolenator also harvests the heat that would otherwise be lost and directs this to heat the salt or polluted water. "The water heats to around 90 degrees, at which point we use the electrical energy from the solar panels to boil the water. We then run the steam through a heat exchange mechanism to heat the next batch of salt/. We then have two outputs, pure and brine (which can be re-circulated through the system)."

They now seek funding to get their system developed and shipped. They have turned to Indiegogo to speed up product development. Among other various price offerings, they set $450 as the pledge price for a Desolinator. Their goal is to raise $150,000. They have assembled a working prototype. Some steps thus far have proved encouraging: they developed the Desolenator in the UK but tested it in India, through five prototype iterations. They said it not only works but "the water tastes great." What is more, their Desolenator took second place at a Climate KiC Clean Launch Pad competition and they established academic partnerships with Liverpool University (UK), Imperial College (UK) and College of Engineering Trivandrum (India). Their map: Put the device through a round of user testing in South India, start production, and have a final product ready to ship by October next year.

Strengths: Their system is a standalone unit; it does not need an external power supply; in turn it is energy-independent and has no moving parts. The developers say a one-off payment will provide water for households for up to 20 years. "The capital cost of the Desolenator is a lot for many people. However as the system lasts for up to 20 years, has no consumables, no filters, needs no energy and only requires basic maintenance, this cost can be mitigated." (The Indiegogo campaign site said that "Many people around the world get their water via a water truck coming to their village. The water truck is irregular and will still need to be boiled to be ready for consumption. It is also expensive - we have met families in South India that pay up to $16 a week for all of their water.")

By 2030 the UN estimates that half the world's population will be living in -stressed areas.


Explore further

Sun-powered desalination for villages in India

More information: desolenator.com/

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mdh
Dec 05, 2014
What materials is the unit made of to withstand brine corossion?

Dec 05, 2014
While rest of the world...tropical parts are struggling for fresh water & foooood, in America, Dogs/Cats are fed/drunk awful lot of them...being in reverse blessed by those Creatures' URINE & FECES. YEKH.
Dire necessesity exists for Cats/Dogs Population Control!

Dec 05, 2014
While rest of the world...tropical parts are struggling for fresh water & foooood, in America, Dogs/Cats are fed/drunk awful lot of them...being in reverse blessed by those Creatures' URINE & FECES. YEKH.
Dire necessesity exists for Cats/Dogs Population Control!

"India Sends Water in 5 LARGE LARGE LARGE Planes to Maldives" in today's news
AND I SEE THIS KIND OF B.S NEWS! U.S has LARGE DOGS + CATS in size & number.

Dec 05, 2014
While rest of the world...tropical parts are struggling for fresh water & foooood, in America, Dogs/Cats are fed/drunk awful lot of them...being in reverse blessed by those Creatures' URINE & FECES. YEKH.
Dire necessesity exists for Cats/Dogs Population Control!
"India Sends Water in 5 LARGE LARGE LARGE Planes to Maldives" in today's news AND I SEE THIS KIND OF B.S NEWS! U.S has LARGE DOGS + CATS in size & number.
WHYWHYWHY? Water was cut off to more than 100,000 residents in the Maldives' capital because of a fire in the city's water treatment plant. READ on ndtv news website! where blacks live on 22nd ave in 1 u.s shtity, water main was broken yesterday...shtill working on!

Dec 05, 2014
India's foreign ministry spokesman Syed Akbaruddin tweets thus: "Indian assistance arrives in Maldives. First IL-76 with drinking water from India lands in Male." Big bird comes with water in its bowels. India's High Commissioner in Maldives @RajeevShahare hands over assistance in the Photo.

Dec 05, 2014
Betterthandoodoo..
@foolspoo
succinct and cogent...
i couldn't have said it better

something i would like to know more about: they call it a desalination system but according to the video, it seems like it also has the ability to purify as well (using heat)

If that is the case, then this device is INVALUABLE to the planet! any source of water then becomes drinkable with very few exceptions

how does this fare with bio-hazards and bacteria i wonder? does it get hot enough to sterilize?

I'm putting these questions into the site

EDIT: https://www.indie...to-water
it is a water purifier as well!

Dec 06, 2014
WATER? Elsewhere, All Over, they use it to Wash the Rear Aperture; But, In Freezing Context, Tissue for Nose-Cum-Rear.
He He He!
People are still living into their 80's and 90's ACTING/WORKING to the Very End .....Producing generations of successful progeny.

Dec 06, 2014
See Manam free on I think Chinese Youku Website.

Dec 06, 2014
would have been nice to see more details about their project, like what is the speed, how many l/h given normal sun radiation, does it work on a cloudy day (in some areas yes, it rains from time to time but the water is not drinkable unfortunately), can the system be scaled up for example in making an onshore/offshore big platform that would send then the water through pipes to mainland, or how are the containers of brine/salt water cleaned since i suspect a lot of minerals will deposit in a crystallized form?

Dec 06, 2014
I have a jaded view of distributing technological artifacts as a way of solving problems in the underdeveloped parts of the world. Learn from history. The best laid plans always seem to go awry.

Enterprising individuals will, for instance, figure out how to disassemble the tech gadget and sell the parts. Or the gadget won't be used effectively, operated by people lacking understanding. Or it will be abused, break down, and be cast aside, adding to some pile of unrecyclable trash.

Dec 06, 2014
I have a jaded view of distributing technological artifacts as a way of solving problems in the underdeveloped parts of the world.
I'm with you on this one. Tech can be a part of the solution (and it is good that people invent stuff like the one in the article) but it must always be accompanied by something more fundamental to make a lasting change: Knowledge of the socioeconomic environment, education and a mindset to allow the tech to work.

Best example: Dumping 'solar ovens' into Africa didn't work - because africans tend to have their warm meal in the evening when solar ovens are non-functional

JRi
Dec 06, 2014
The device looks good. Heat is circulated effectively to warm incoming water. Electricity is used to boil the water, which both desalinates and desinfects the water coming out.

The only problem is the hefty price $450, which they must bring down. Otherwise the device will loose to other alternatives.

Dec 06, 2014
Astute comments above are based on experience. IF these tech ideas are so successful, then there would be no need to 'find' funding, there would be start ups in place. And isnt arsenic a big problem?

Dec 06, 2014
Good luck trying to ever buy one of these. You will probably never here about it again just like the water bottle that was supposed to harvest water from moisture in the air.

Dec 06, 2014
How many nay-sayers here have developed anything?

Dec 06, 2014
"How many nay-sayers here have developed anything?"

-How many lying bullshit artists here have developed anything?

Dec 06, 2014
-How many lying bullshit artists here have developed anything?
Well, there is Las Vegas

Dec 06, 2014
"Well, there is Las Vegas"
--------------------
And we blew over $4,000,000,000,000 killing those 200,000 Iraqi civilians who had done nothing to us.

Dec 07, 2014
WATER? Elsewhere, All Over, they use it to Wash the Rear Aperture; But, In Freezing Context, Tissue for Nose-Cum-Rear.
He He He!
People are still living into their 80's and 90's ACTING/WORKING to the Very End .....Producing generations of successful progeny.

What is the SEQUECE?
Rear Then Nose?? #1 FOOLS!

Dec 07, 2014
UNSW Australia's solar researchers have converted over 40% of the sunlight hitting a solar system into electricity, the highest efficiency ever reported. On Eurekalert Today

Dec 07, 2014
Known as the 'Father of photovoltaics', Martin Green is a Scientia Professor at UNSW and Director of the Australian National Energy Agency-supported Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics. He was elected into the prestigious Fellowship of the Royal Society in 2013.

Dec 07, 2014
"Value of photosynthetic efficiency is dependent on how light energy is defined – depends on whether we count only the light absorbed, on what kind of light is used.Takes 8-10 photons to utilize 1 molecule of CO2. For converting a mole of CO2 to glucose is 114 kcal, whereas 8 moles of photons of wavelength 600 nm contains 381 kcal, giving nominal efficiency of 30%. Photosynthesis can occur with light up to wavelength 720 nm if there is light at wavelengths below 680 nm to keep Photosystem II operating (see Chlorophyll). Using longer wavelengths means less light energy is needed for the same number of photons & therefore for same amount of photosynthesis. For sunlight, where only 45% of the light is in photosynthetically active wavelength range, the theoretical maximum efficiency of solar energy conversion is 11%.Wiki

Dec 07, 2014
Breakdown of the energetics of photosynthesis process: Starting with solar spectrum falling on a leaf,
47% lost due to photons outside 400–700 nm active range (chlorophyll utilizes photons between 400 and 700 nm, extracting the energy of one 700 nm photon from each one); 30% of in-band photons are lost due to incomplete absorption or photons hitting components other than chloroplasts. 24% of absorbed photon energy is lost due to degrading short wavelength photons to the 700 nm energy level. 68% of utilized energy is lost in conversion into d-glucose. 35–45% of glucose is consumed by the leaf in the processes of dark and photo respirationWiki

Dec 07, 2014
Stated another way: 100% sunlight → non-bioavailable photons waste is 47%, leaving 53% (in 400–700 nm range) → 30% of photons are lost due to incomplete absorption, leaving 37% (absorbed photon energy) → 24% is lost due to wavelength-mismatch degradation to 700 nm energy, leaving 28.2% (sunlight energy collected by chlorophyl) → 32% efficient conversion of ATP and NADPH to d-glucose, leaving
9% (collected as sugar) → 35–40% of sugar is recycled/consumed by the leaf in dark and photo-respiration, leaving 5.4% NET leaf efficiency. Plants lose much of remaining energy on growing roots. Most crop plants store ~0.25% to 0.5% of the sunlight in the product (corn kernels, potato starch, etc.). Sugar cane is exceptional in several ways, yielding peak storage efficiencies of ~8% WIKI

Dec 07, 2014
Half of the Sunlight is useless for plants because of Wavelength suitability issues. Out of the remaining half....Another half of it used for plant's own growth....etc., etc.,
It all ends up with 8% Efficiency Max in the Sugarcane

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