LG Display shows off a thin, wall-stuck OLED panel of the future

LG Display shows off a thin, wall-stuck panel of the future
Credit: LG Display

What if you could stick an OLED panel on your wall with a magnetic mat? A detachable OLED (organic light-emitting diode) panel that would just as easily be taken off as stuck on the wall? Reports surfaced on Tuesday that South Korea-based LG Display has fashioned just the thing, a 0.97 mm thick 55" flat OLED TV panel and only 1.9 kilos (4.2 pounds). LG Display showcased the screen in Korea.

By comparison, LG Display's existing 55-inch OLED panel is 4.3 mm thick. Engadget's Jon Fingas said that "it raises the possibility of big-screen sets that easily blend into your living room's décor." That's the good news. The sad news is that there is no word about when such displays will make it to retail shops.

The unveiling was part of a broader announcement to showcase the company's plans for the future, which center on OLED tech, said Don Reisinger in CNET. The screen was presented as one of the company's future displays at the media event. Using a magnetic mat, the screen can easily be stuck to—or removed from— a wall. To remove the display from the wall, said Reisinger, you peel the screen off the mat. The Yonhap News Agency report carried a photograph of a model gently lifting the detachable wallpaper OLED panel at the event in Seoul on Tuesday. Yonhap News Agency referred to the LG Display screen as a "wallpaper OLED panel." Don Reisinger of CNET referred to it as press-on wallpaper TV.

Strategically, the unveiling tells us something about LG Display, said reports; the company appears to view high-end displays as a growth engine. (They released 55-inch, 66-inch and 77-inch OLED models earlier in the year, said Yonhap News Agency.) The showing also indicates that LG Display continues to focus attention on OLED.

LG Display shows off a thin, wall-stuck panel of the future
Credit: LG Display

Reisinger offered reasons for why OLED "is widely believed to be the next frontier." He said, "The technology adds an organic compound layer that allows not only for exceedingly thin screens, but for those displays to be curved. The organic material also emits its own light, eliminating the need for a backlight. That allows for such thin screens and has made OLED a desirable choice not only for televisions, but for a wide range of wearables and other mobile products."

While the wall-sticking panel is a delight to view, Ryan Waniata, writing in Digital Trends on Tuesday, expressed his view that "Such a display probably won't be used in a TV anytime in the near future; it's more likely to end up in wearable technology, automobile manufacturing, and commercial applications." Still, he added, "we could conceivably see such technology (paired with an outboard processing unit) becoming the TV of the future."


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May 20, 2015
Would love to see a video of this

May 20, 2015
So thin, I would love to stick that to my wall. Oh, and yeah, that OLED panel..nice....

May 20, 2015
*Begins foaming at the mouth*

This is the type of technology I've always dreamed about including around the house. Prominent, yet not intrusive or bulky in design. Imagine using these as the next generation picture frames, where you can simply do away with the frame and leave it on your wall as decoration. *sighs*

May 20, 2015
I foresee fingernail tears in future owners of this TV, not to mention the little kinks on the edges from peeling it off the walls.

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