This article has been reviewed according to Science X's editorial process and policies. Editors have highlighted the following attributes while ensuring the content's credibility:

fact-checked

reputable news agency

proofread

Bluetooth inventors get OK to use Viking king's name

Bluetooth
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

To the backdrop of the vast Jelling stones, Denmark on Tuesday granted the inventors of Bluetooth technology permission to use the name and symbol of Harald the Bluetooth for the next 1,000 years .

"In a spirit of goodwill and cooperation, we hereby authorize you to continue to use the name, Harald Bluetooth, for the next 1,000 years," said a symbolic statement from the Jelling museum, which owns the eponymous runestones that tell the story of the king and his family.

King Harald I Blatand—Harald Bluetooth—was a key historical figure in 10th-century northern Europe, famous for his adoption of Christianity, turning his back on the cult of Odin and Thor.

The man who owes his nickname to a , or according to other sources to his immoderate taste for blackberries and bilberries, was also the father of Norway's union with Denmark, which lasted until 1814.

Modern-day Bluetooth, which enables to connect without cables, owes its name to the unifying king.

"The idea behind the new technology was that it should connect and unify. Just like Harald Bluetooth did when he unified Denmark and Norway," explained one of the inventors of the technology, Jim Kardach, quoted in a statement.

"We sincerely regret not seeking your permission before borrowing the name... We acknowledge that it was a rather cheeky move on our part."

© 2023 AFP

Citation: Bluetooth inventors get OK to use Viking king's name (2023, October 10) retrieved 1 March 2024 from https://techxplore.com/news/2023-10-bluetooth-inventors-viking-king.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Explore further

How beers and Vikings gave Bluetooth technology its name

26 shares

Feedback to editors