Machine learning & AI

Study showcases new method for better grouping in data analysis

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and UC Berkeley have developed a new method to improve how computers organize and analyze large datasets. This advancement improves the ability to extract information from knowledge ...

Energy & Green Tech

New software provides advanced grid simulation capabilities

Power companies and electric grid developers turn to simulation tools as they attempt to understand how modern equipment will be affected by rapidly unfolding events in a complex grid. A challenging and particularly promising ...

Computer Sciences

Researchers develop the fastest possible flow algorithm

In a breakthrough that brings to mind Lucky Luke—the man who shoots faster than his shadow—Rasmus Kyng and his team have developed a superfast algorithm that looks set to transform an entire field of research.

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Algorithm

In mathematics, computing, linguistics, and related subjects, an algorithm is a finite sequence of instructions, an explicit, step-by-step procedure for solving a problem, often used for calculation and data processing. It is formally a type of effective method in which a list of well-defined instructions for completing a task, will when given an initial state, proceed through a well-defined series of successive states, eventually terminating in an end-state. The transition from one state to the next is not necessarily deterministic; some algorithms, known as probabilistic algorithms, incorporate randomness.

A partial formalization of the concept began with attempts to solve the Entscheidungsproblem (the "decision problem") posed by David Hilbert in 1928. Subsequent formalizations were framed as attempts to define "effective calculability" (Kleene 1943:274) or "effective method" (Rosser 1939:225); those formalizations included the Gödel-Herbrand-Kleene recursive functions of 1930, 1934 and 1935, Alonzo Church's lambda calculus of 1936, Emil Post's "Formulation 1" of 1936, and Alan Turing's Turing machines of 1936–7 and 1939.

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