Engineering

How spider silk research led to a new kind of microphone

The human ability to notice the world around us is made possible by our sense organs—eyes, ears, nose, skin and tongue—which are so efficient that most people don't consciously think about them. Others, like Distinguished ...

Energy & Green Tech

Syngas photocatalysis made easy

A study published in the journal PNAS Nexus reports a photocatalyst to enable solar-driven syngas production from methane steam reforming—a possible bridge fuel to a post-carbon energy world.

Engineering

Reclaiming carbon fibers from discarded composite materials

Minimizing energy consumption is a fundamental element in our journey towards sustainable societies, and advanced materials play a key role in this regard. Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRPs) and carbon-fiber-reinforced ...

Energy & Green Tech

Researchers develop method for collecting clean water from fog

In countries such as Peru, Bolivia and Chile, it's not uncommon for people who live in foggy areas to hang up nets to catch droplets of water. The same is true of Morocco and Oman. These droplets then trickle down the mesh ...

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Atmosphere

An atmosphere (from Greek ατμός - atmos, 'vapor' + σφαίρα - sphaira, 'sphere') is a layer of gases that may surround a material body of sufficient mass, by the gravity of the body, and are retained for a longer duration if gravity is high and the atmosphere's temperature is low. Some planets consist mainly of various gases, but only their outer layer is their atmosphere (see gas giants).

The term stellar atmosphere describes the outer region of a star, and typically includes the portion starting from the opaque photosphere outwards. Relatively low-temperature stars may form compound molecules in their outer atmosphere. Earth's atmosphere, which contains oxygen used by most organisms for respiration and carbon dioxide used by plants, algae and cyanobacteria for photosynthesis, also protects living organisms from genetic damage by solar ultraviolet radiation. Its current composition is the product of billions of years of biochemical modification of the paleoatmosphere by living organisms.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA