Telecom

Top EU court enshrines net neutrality in Europe

The EU's top court ruled for the first time on the bloc's net neutrality rules Tuesday and confirmed that companies could not punish customers with a two-speed internet.

Automotive

VW's former CEO to stand trial over 'dieselgate'

Volkswagen's former chief executive Martin Winterkorn will stand trial over the car giant's massive "dieselgate" scam, a German court said Wednesday, five years after the scandal rocked the automobile industry.

Business

US military sticks with Microsoft for $10 bn cloud contract

The US Department of Defense said Friday it is sticking with its decision to award a $10 billion cloud computing contract to Microsoft, despite Amazon's claims that President Donald Trump improperly influenced the process.

Business

Virgin Atlantic completes rescue plan; 1,150 jobs lost

Virgin Atlantic completed its 1.2 billion-pound ($1.6 billion) restructuring plan and cut 1,150 jobs Friday as the airline sought to rebuild following the devastation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Business

High Court in London backs Virgin Atlantic's rescue plan

Virgin Atlantic's 1.2 billion-pound ($1.6 billion) restructuring plan was approved Wednesday by the High Court in London, allowing the international airline to continue rebuilding its operations after the devastation caused ...

Security

Tesla targeted in failed ransomware extortion scheme

In a tweet, Tesla CEO Elon Musk solved a mystery involving a 27-year-old Russian, an insider at an unnamed corporation and an alleged million-dollar payment offered to help trigger a ransomware extortion attack on the firm.

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Court

A court is a body, often a governmental institution, with the authority to adjudicate legal disputes and dispense civil, criminal, or administrative justice in accordance with rules of law. In common law and civil law states, courts are the central means for dispute resolution, and it is generally understood that all persons have an ability to bring their claims before a court. Similarly, those accused of a crime have the right to present their defense before a court.

Court facilities range from a simple farmhouse for a village court in a rural community to huge buildings housing dozens of courtrooms in large cities.

A court is a kind of deliberative assembly with special powers, called its jurisdiction, or jus dicere, to decide certain kinds of questions or petitions put to it. According to William Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England, a court is constituted by a minimum of three parties, namely, the actor, reus, and judex, though, often, courts consist of additional attorneys, bailiffs, reporters, and perhaps a jury.

The term "court" is often used to refer to the president of the court, also known as the "judge" or the "bench", or the panel of such officials. For example, in the United States, and other common law jurisdictions, the term "court" (in the case of U.S. federal courts) by law is used to describe the judge himself or herself.

In the United States, the legal authority of a court to take action is based on three pillars of power over the parties to the litigation: (1) Personal jurisdiction; (2) Subject matter jurisdiction; and (3) Venue.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA