Security

Keeping it real: How to spot a deepfake

In a world where you can create a virtual clone of a person in a matter of minutes, how do we know what's real? It may sound like dystopian science fiction, but deepfakes are a reality causing serious social, financial and ...

Computer Sciences

Q&A: Alexa, am I happy? How AI emotion recognition falls short

Is the fear of public speaking the same as being chased by a bear? Does raising an eyebrow convey amusement or confusion? In 1995, Rosalind Picard, a scientist and inventor, introduced the idea of computers developing the ...

Robotics

GPT-4 driven robot takes selfies, 'eats' popcorn

A team of researchers at the University of Tokyo has built a bridge between large language models and robots that promises more humanlike gestures while dispensing with traditional hardware-dependent controls.

Computer Sciences

Creating realistic 'talking heads' with an AI-powered program

A team of researchers led by Assoc Prof Lu Shijian from the NTU School of Computer Science and Engineering has developed a computer program that creates realistic videos that reflect the facial expressions and head movements ...

Robotics

How human faces can teach androids to smile

Robots able to display human emotion have long been a mainstay of science fiction stories. Now, Japanese researchers have been studying the mechanical details of real human facial expressions to bring those stories closer ...

Hi Tech & Innovation

Robot stand-in mimics your movements in VR

Researchers from Cornell and Brown University have developed a souped-up telepresence robot that responds automatically and in real-time to a remote user's movements and gestures made in virtual reality.

Computer Sciences

Toward affective computing that works for everyone

Diversity and inclusion are critical aspects of the responsible development of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies, including affective computing. Affective computing, which focuses on recognizing, interpreting, and ...

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Facial expression

A facial expression results from one or more motions or positions of the muscles of the face. These movements convey the emotional state of the individual to observers. Facial expressions are a form of nonverbal communication. They are a primary means of conveying social information among humans, but also occur in most other mammals and some other animal species.

Humans can adopt a facial expression as a voluntary action. However, because expressions are closely tied to emotion, they are more often involuntary. It can be nearly impossible to avoid expressions for certain emotions, even when it would be strongly desirable to do so; a person who is trying to avoid insult to an individual he or she finds highly unattractive might nevertheless show a brief expression of disgust before being able to reassume a neutral expression. The close link between emotion and expression can also work in the other direction; it has been observed that voluntarily assuming an expression can actually cause the associated emotion.[citation needed]

Some expressions can be accurately interpreted even between members of different species- anger and extreme contentment being the primary examples. Others, however, are difficult to interpret even in familiar individuals. For instance, disgust and fear can be tough to tell apart.[citation needed]

Because faces have only a limited range of movement, expressions rely upon fairly minuscule differences in the proportion and relative position of facial features, and reading them requires considerable sensitivity to same. Some faces are often falsely read as expressing some emotion, even when they are neutral, because their proportions naturally resemble those another face would temporarily assume when emoting.[citation needed]

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA