Energy & Green Tech

Reducing carbon emissions with net-zero technologies

The EU intends to become climate neutral by 2050—through the European Green Deal and a tax on carbon emissions. Fraunhofer-research scientists are helping businesses capitalize on net-zero technologies for this. They improve ...

Business

Green energy takes hold in unlikely places with Ford project

When Ford revealed plans to ramp up its commitment to the fledgling electric vehicle sector, the automaker chose to create thousands of jobs and pump billions in investments into two states where Republican leaders have vilified ...

Energy & Green Tech

France's EDF in talks with GE to buy nuclear turbine ops

French electricity giant EDF is in talks with General Electric to buy its steam turbine business for nuclear plants, the companies confirmed Wednesday, the latest move by the American conglomerate to streamline its operations ...

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Fuel

Fuel is any material that is burned or altered to obtain energy and to heat or to move an object. Fuel releases its energy either through a chemical reaction means, such as combustion, or nuclear means, such as nuclear fission or nuclear fusion. An important property of a useful fuel is that its energy can be stored to be released only when needed, and that the release is controlled in such a way that the energy can be harnessed to produce work. Examples: Methane, Petrol and Oil.

All carbon-based life forms—from microorganisms to animals and humans—depend on and use fuels as their source of energy. Their cells engage in an enzyme-mediated chemical process called metabolism that converts energy from food or light into a form that can be used to sustain life. Additionally, humans employ a variety of techniques to convert one form of energy into another, producing usable energy for purposes that go far beyond the energy needs of a human body. The application of energy released from fuels ranges from heat to cooking and from powering weapons to combustion and generation of electricity.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA