Energy & Green Tech

Pollution-free hydrogen: green energy breakthrough?

Scientists said Tuesday they have developed a way of extracting hydrogen from oil without releasing greenhouse gases—a breakthrough they hailed as a "silver bullet" for cleaner energy and the climate.

Energy & Green Tech

Generating clean electricity with chicken feathers

The food industry generates enormous amounts of waste and by-products, including from poultry production. Each year, some 40 million metric tons of chicken feathers are incinerated. This not only releases large amounts of ...

Energy & Green Tech

Unlocking the power of photosynthesis for clean energy production

As the world faces an increasing demand for clean and sustainable energy sources, scientists are turning to the power of photosynthesis for inspiration. With the goal of developing new, environmentally friendly techniques ...

Energy & Green Tech

Scientists convert chicken fat into energy storage devices

The global move toward more sustainable, green energy has increased power reserves and the demand for energy storage devices. Unfortunately, some materials for these devices can be expensive and environmentally problematic. ...

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Gas

Gas is one of the three classical states of matter (the others being liquid and solid). Near absolute zero, a substance exists as a solid. As heat is added to this substance it melts into a liquid at its melting point (see phase change), boils into a gas at its boiling point, and if heated high enough would enter a plasma state in which the electrons are so energized that they leave their parent atoms from within the gas. A pure gas may be made up of individual atoms (e.g. a noble gas or atomic gas like neon), elemental molecules made from one type of atom (e.g. oxygen), or compound molecules made from a variety of atoms (e.g. carbon dioxide). A gas mixture would contain a variety of pure gases much like the air. What distinguishes a gas from liquids and solids is the vast separation of the individual gas particles. This separation usually makes a colorless gas invisible to the human observer. The interaction of gas particles in the presence of electric and gravitational fields are considered negligible as indicated by the constant velocity vectors in the image.

The gaseous state of matter is found between the liquid and plasma states, the latter of which provides the upper temperature boundary for gases. Bounding the lower end of the temperature scale lie degenerative quantum gases which are gaining increased attention these days. High-density atomic gases super cooled to incredibly low temperatures are classified by their statistical behavior as either a Bose gas or a Fermi gas. For a comprehensive listing of these exotic states of matter see list of states of matter.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA