Other

Teaching algorithms about skin tones

When Ellis Monk's wife became pregnant in 2019, the couple became curious about what skin tone their child might have. The subject was of more than passing interest to the sociology professor, some of whose work involves ...

Electronics & Semiconductors

Using the model of a pancake stack to make better solar cells

Researchers from the University of Calgary (UCalgary), with help from colleagues at the University of Saskatchewan (USask), are one step closer to creating solar electronics that are flexible, powerful, and better for the ...

Software

Revolutionizing data access through new software tool: Tiled

Every time scientists study a new material for future batteries or investigate diseases to develop new drugs, they must wade through an ocean of data. Today, a whole ecosystem of scientific tools creates a wild variety of ...

Energy & Green Tech

Method discovered to boost energy generation from microalgae

The variety of humble algae that cover the surface of ponds and seas could hold the key to boosting the efficiency of artificial photosynthesis, allowing scientists to produce more energy and lower waste in the process.

Engineering

Helicopter-mounted device measures methane in ship exhaust

Researchers have developed a new gas sensor that is compact and lightweight enough to monitor emissions in ship exhaust from an airborne vehicle. The device uses mid-infrared supercontinuum gas spectrometry to simultaneously ...

Engineering

Mantis shrimp inspires new breed of light sensors

Inspired by the eyes of mantis shrimp, researchers have developed a new kind of optical sensor that is small enough to fit on a smartphone but is capable of hyperspectral and polarimetric imaging.

Consumer & Gadgets

Why do smoke alarms keep going off even when there's no smoke?

Editor's note: MVS Chandrashekhar is a professor of electrical engineering at the University of South Carolina. In this interview, he explains how smoke detectors work and why they sometimes sound an alarm for what seems ...

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Light

Light is electromagnetic radiation, particularly radiation of a wavelength that is visible to the human eye (about 400–700 nm, or perhaps 380–750 nm.) In physics, the term light sometimes refers to electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength, whether visible or not.

Three primary properties of light are:

Light, which exists in tiny "packets" called photons, exhibits properties of both waves and particles. This property is referred to as the wave–particle duality. The study of light, known as optics, is an important research area in modern physics.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA