Energy & Green Tech

35 years since nuclear disaster, Chernobyl warns, inspires

The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world's worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for ...

Energy & Green Tech

China's bitcoin mining rush risks derailing climate goals

China's electricity-hungry bitcoin mines that power nearly 80 percent of the global trade in cryptocurrencies risk undercutting the country's climate goals, a study in the journal Nature Communications said on Tuesday.

Energy & Green Tech

The global race to develop 'green' hydrogen

It's seen as the missing link in the race for carbon-neutrality: "green" hydrogen produced without fossil fuel energy is a popular buzzword in competing press releases and investment plans across the globe.

Energy & Green Tech

Los Angeles now has a road map for 100% renewable energy

Los Angeles is one of the last places in California still burning coal for electricity—and if all goes according to plan, it could become one of the country's first major cities to nearly eliminate fossil fuels from its ...

Energy & Green Tech

How dangerous is the Fukushima nuke plant today?

A decade ago, a massive tsunami crashed into the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Three of its reactors melted down, leaving it looking like a bombed-out factory. Emergency workers risked their lives trying to keep ...

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Power station

A power station (also referred to as a generating station, power plant, or powerhouse) is an industrial facility for the generation of electric power.

Power plant is also used to refer to the engine in ships, aircraft and other large vehicles. Some prefer to use the term energy center because it more accurately describes what the plants do, which is the conversion of other forms of energy, like chemical energy, gravitational potential energy or heat energy into electrical energy. However, power plant is the most common term in the U.S., while elsewhere power station and power plant are both widely used, power station prevailing in many Commonwealth countries and especially in the United Kingdom.

At the center of nearly all power stations is a generator, a rotating machine that converts mechanical energy into electrical energy by creating relative motion between a magnetic field and a conductor. The energy source harnessed to turn the generator varies widely. It depends chiefly on which fuels are easily available and on the types of technology that the power company has access to.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA