Security

Navigating data privacy in a post-Roe world

The end of Roe v. Wade—a woman's constitutional right to an abortion—has led some digital privacy experts, including Stanford's Riana Pfefferkorn, to ask what could happen to women seeking reproductive healthcare in a ...

Engineering

Intelligent wireless walls for contactless in-home monitoring

Patient health care strongly relies on in-hospital situation and remote monitoring at home is very challenging. Various human activity recognition systems have been proposed exploiting sensors, cameras and wearables. However, ...

Internet

New research puts your online privacy preferences to the test

When it comes to privacy, you've probably heard some say they "don't care about privacy if there's nothing to hide." Typically, someone who says this is not taking into account that you may have strong beliefs on the very ...

Consumer & Gadgets

Rolling privacy into collaborative tools for online working

The rise in online working and collaboration wrought by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic that started in 2020 continues apace. In parallel we see a rise in security issues surrounding the enabling technologies. A team from India ...

Business

Netflix to rely on Microsoft for its ad-backed video service

Netflix has picked Microsoft to help deliver the commercials in a cheaper version of its video streaming service expected to launch later this year with a pledge to minimize the intrusions into personal privacy that often ...

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Privacy

Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to seclude themselves or information about themselves and thereby reveal themselves selectively. The boundaries and content of what is considered private differ among cultures and individuals, but share basic common themes. Privacy is sometimes related to anonymity, the wish to remain unnoticed or unidentified in the public realm. When something is private to a person, it usually means there is something within them that is considered inherently special or personally sensitive. The degree to which private information is exposed therefore depends on how the public will receive this information, which differs between places and over time. Privacy can be seen as an aspect of security — one in which trade-offs between the interests of one group and another can become particularly clear.

The right against unsanctioned invasion of privacy by the government, corporations or individuals is part of many countries' privacy laws, and in some cases, constitutions. Almost all countries have laws which in some way limit privacy; an example of this would be law concerning taxation, which normally require the sharing of information about personal income or earnings. In some countries individual privacy may conflict with freedom of speech laws and some laws may require public disclosure of information which would be considered private in other countries and cultures.

Privacy may be voluntarily sacrificed, normally in exchange for perceived benefits and very often with specific dangers and losses, although this is a very strategic view of human relationships. Academics who are economists, evolutionary theorists, and research psychologists describe revealing privacy as a 'voluntary sacrifice', where sweepstakes or competitions are involved. In the business world, a person may give personal details (often for advertising purposes) in order to enter a gamble of winning a prize. Information which is voluntarily shared and is later stolen or misused can lead to identity theft.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA