Internet

Bug may have exposed photos from 7M Facebook users

Facebook's privacy controls have broken down yet again, this time through a software flaw affecting nearly 7 million users who had photos exposed to a much wider audience than intended.

Security

Is your smartphone spying on you?

Some popular apps on your phone may be secretly taking screenshots of your activity and sending them to third parties, according to a new study by a team of Northeastern researchers.

Security

ProtonVPN out of beta, offering free and paid service types

(Tech Xplore)—A Switzerland-based company earlier this week released a free virtual private network together with a tier-based system that provides even more VPN level of support. The new product is from ProtonVPN AG headquartered ...

Computer Sciences

Facial recognition is increasingly common, but how does it work?

The Trump administration's efforts to impose new immigration rules drew attention – and legal fire – for its restrictions on the ability of people born in certain majority Muslim countries to enter the U.S. In the frenzy ...

Software

Mobile app behavior often appears at odds with privacy policies

How a mobile app says it will collect or share a user's personal information with third parties often appears to be inconsistent with how the app actually behaves, a new automated analysis system developed by Carnegie Mellon ...

Software

Do Not Track will be off default state in IE, Spartan

The Do Not Track (DNT) requests that a web application disable its tracking individual users. Well, Microsoft announced it is changing how Do Not Track (DNT) is implemented in future versions of their browsers. They will ...

Consumer & Gadgets

WEDG wants to make a difference in personal cloud privacy

Shehbaz Afzal, CEO of WEDG, is ready to share what he and his group have been working on for the past months, and he has taken to Indiegogo to raise funding. WEDG is promoted as "a revolutionary cloud email and storage solution ...

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Privacy

Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to seclude themselves or information about themselves and thereby reveal themselves selectively. The boundaries and content of what is considered private differ among cultures and individuals, but share basic common themes. Privacy is sometimes related to anonymity, the wish to remain unnoticed or unidentified in the public realm. When something is private to a person, it usually means there is something within them that is considered inherently special or personally sensitive. The degree to which private information is exposed therefore depends on how the public will receive this information, which differs between places and over time. Privacy can be seen as an aspect of security — one in which trade-offs between the interests of one group and another can become particularly clear.

The right against unsanctioned invasion of privacy by the government, corporations or individuals is part of many countries' privacy laws, and in some cases, constitutions. Almost all countries have laws which in some way limit privacy; an example of this would be law concerning taxation, which normally require the sharing of information about personal income or earnings. In some countries individual privacy may conflict with freedom of speech laws and some laws may require public disclosure of information which would be considered private in other countries and cultures.

Privacy may be voluntarily sacrificed, normally in exchange for perceived benefits and very often with specific dangers and losses, although this is a very strategic view of human relationships. Academics who are economists, evolutionary theorists, and research psychologists describe revealing privacy as a 'voluntary sacrifice', where sweepstakes or competitions are involved. In the business world, a person may give personal details (often for advertising purposes) in order to enter a gamble of winning a prize. Information which is voluntarily shared and is later stolen or misused can lead to identity theft.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA