Machine learning & AI

Could quantum give us the generative AI we're looking for?

Quantum computing and artificial intelligence (AI) might seem as distant from each other as New York and Los Angeles. But according to Duke Quantum Center (DQC) director Chris Monroe, the two subjects are practically next-door ...

Engineering

Trajectoids: Creating a shape that rolls along a desired path

Normally, when we think of a rolling object, we tend to imagine a torus (like a bicycle wheel) or a sphere (like a tennis ball) that will always follow a straight path when rolling. However, the world of mathematics and science ...

Computer Sciences

Using quantum computing to protect AI from attack

Machine learning is a field of artificial intelligence (AI) where computer models become experts in various tasks by consuming large amounts of data. This is instead of a human explicitly programming this level of expertise.

Energy & Green Tech

Quantum computers can now interface with power grid equipment

With its head-spinning size and connections, the power system is so complex that even supercomputers struggle to efficiently solve certain optimization problems. But quantum computers might fare better, and now researchers ...

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Quantum computer

A quantum computer is a device for computation that makes direct use of quantum mechanical phenomena, such as superposition and entanglement, to perform operations on data. The basic principle behind quantum computation is that quantum properties can be used to represent data and perform operations on these data.

Although quantum computing is still in its infancy, experiments have been carried out in which quantum computational operations were executed on a very small number of qubits (quantum binary digits). Both practical and theoretical research continues with interest, and many national government and military funding agencies support quantum computing research to develop quantum computers for both civilian and national security purposes, such as cryptanalysis.

If large-scale quantum computers can be built, they will be able to solve certain problems much faster than any of our current classical computers (for example Shor's algorithm). Quantum computers are different from other computers such as DNA computers and traditional computers based on transistors. Some computing architectures such as optical computers may use classical superposition of electromagnetic waves. Without some specifically quantum mechanical resources such as entanglement, it is conjectured that an exponential advantage over classical computers is not possible.

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