Engineering

New and improved drone mapping software

For his thesis, an EPFL Ph.D. student has enhanced the accuracy and reliability of drone mapping—a technique that is gaining traction across many sectors of society.

Automotive

Tesla comes when called, but can fray nerves

Roddie Hasan loves his Tesla, but after a fright using a feature that lets him summon the car as he might a dog, he says he will be walking to get it.

Robotics

Robotic bees are joining the International Space Station

"There are some things only humans can do in space. The rest can be left to robots." The NASA team is showcasing hw to put that simple observation into interesting practice with their development of Astrobees.

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Remote control

A remote control is an electronic device used for the remote operation of a machine.

The term remote control can be contracted to remote or controller. It is known by many other names as well, such as clicker, flipper or the changer. Commonly, remote controls are Consumer IR devices used to issue commands from a distance to televisions or other consumer electronics such as stereo systems DVD players and dimmers. Remote controls for these devices are usually small wireless handheld objects with an array of buttons for adjusting various settings such as television channel, track number, and volume. In fact, for the majority of modern devices with this kind of control, the remote contains all the function controls while the controlled device itself only has a handful of essential primary controls. Most of these remotes communicate to their respective devices via infrared (IR) signals and a few via radio signals. Television IR signals can be mimicked by a universal remote, which is able to emulate the functionality of most major brand television remote controls. They are usually powered by small AAA or AA size batteries.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA