Electronics & Semiconductors

Reduced power consumption in semiconductor devices

Stepping stones are placed to help travelers to cross streams. As long as there are stepping stones that connect both sides of the water, one can easily get across with just a few steps. Using the same principle, a research ...

Business

Foxconn strikes $19.4 bn deal to make chips in India

Taiwanese electronics giant Foxconn will invest $19.4 billion to make semiconductors in India with local conglomerate Vedanta, backed by New Delhi's push to boost tech self-reliance after a global chip shortage.

Engineering

Modified microwave oven cooks up next-gen semiconductors

A household microwave oven modified by a Cornell engineering professor is helping to cook up the next generation of cellphones, computers and other electronics after the invention was shown to overcome a major challenge faced ...

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Semiconductor

A semiconductor is a material that has a resistivity value between that of a conductor and an insulator. The conductivity of a semiconductor material can be varied under an external electrical field. Devices made from semiconductor materials are the foundation of modern electronics, including radio, computers, telephones, and many other devices. Semiconductor devices include the transistor, solar cells, many kinds of diodes including the light-emitting diode, the silicon controlled rectifier, and digital and analog integrated circuits. Solar photovoltaic panels are large semiconductor devices that directly convert light energy into electrical energy. In a metallic conductor, current is carried by the flow of electrons. In semiconductors, current can be carried either by the flow of electrons or by the flow of positively-charged "holes" in the electron structure of the material.

Silicon is used to create most semiconductors commercially. Dozens of other materials are used, including germanium, gallium arsenide, and silicon carbide. A pure semiconductor is often called an “intrinsic” semiconductor. The conductivity, or ability to conduct, of semiconductor material can be drastically changed by adding other elements, called “impurities” to the melted intrinsic material and then allowing the melt to solidify into a new and different crystal. This process is called "doping".

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