Electronics & Semiconductors

White House convenes CEO summit on semiconductor shortage

The White House will hold a virtual summit with leading CEOs on Monday to discuss the global semiconductor shortage that has crimped automakers and electronics companies, officials announced Friday.

Business

Chipmaker TSMC says revenue up 16.7% as demand surges

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., the world's biggest contract producer of processor chips, said Friday its revenue rose 16.7% in the latest quarter over a year ago as the global economy rebounded from the coronavirus ...

Business

Taiwan's TSMC plans $100 billion investment to meet demand

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company said Thursday it was planning to invest $100 billion over the next three years to meet soaring demand as a global shortage of chips hits the auto and other industries.

Electronics & Semiconductors

Why the semiconductor shortage won't end soon

Your smartphone? It runs on a semiconductor. The innards of your PlayStation? It runs on a semiconductor. The display in your car? Yes, that too runs on a semiconductor.

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Semiconductor

A semiconductor is a material that has a resistivity value between that of a conductor and an insulator. The conductivity of a semiconductor material can be varied under an external electrical field. Devices made from semiconductor materials are the foundation of modern electronics, including radio, computers, telephones, and many other devices. Semiconductor devices include the transistor, solar cells, many kinds of diodes including the light-emitting diode, the silicon controlled rectifier, and digital and analog integrated circuits. Solar photovoltaic panels are large semiconductor devices that directly convert light energy into electrical energy. In a metallic conductor, current is carried by the flow of electrons. In semiconductors, current can be carried either by the flow of electrons or by the flow of positively-charged "holes" in the electron structure of the material.

Silicon is used to create most semiconductors commercially. Dozens of other materials are used, including germanium, gallium arsenide, and silicon carbide. A pure semiconductor is often called an “intrinsic” semiconductor. The conductivity, or ability to conduct, of semiconductor material can be drastically changed by adding other elements, called “impurities” to the melted intrinsic material and then allowing the melt to solidify into a new and different crystal. This process is called "doping".

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA