Consumer & Gadgets

Skin patch biomarker sensor that doesn't need batteries

An international team of researchers has developed a skin patch that serves as a biomarker sensor—one that does not need batteries. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances,, the group describes the new ...

Engineering

A new smartphone user authentication system based on gait analysis

A team of researchers at the University of Pretoria and City University of Hong Kong has recently developed a continuous smartphone user authentication system based on gait analysis. This system, outlined in a paper presented ...

Robotics

Engineers develop robotic greeter to welcome new arrivals

A team of researchers at Media Innovation Lab at the IDC Herzliya, Israel, collaborating with a team from Cornell University, has developed a new type of robot with very limited abilities. Its only purpose is to greet people ...

Engineering

A safe, wearable soft sensor

Children born prematurely often develop neuromotor and cognitive developmental disabilities. The best way to reduce the impacts of those disabilities is to catch them early through a series of cognitive and motor tests. But ...

Robotics

Plant cyborg able to move itself to a preferred light source

A team of researchers at the MIT Media Lab built a cyborg that combines a plant with electronics and ultimately allows the plant to choose when it would like to move to a brighter spot. The cyborg is the brainchild of team ...

Robotics

Electronic glove gives robots a sense of touch

Stanford engineers have developed an electronic glove containing sensors that could one day give robotic hands the sort of dexterity that humans take for granted.

Engineering

Electronic skin points the way north

While birds naturally perceive the Earth's magnetic field and use it for orientation, humans do not share this ability—at least, until now. Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) in Germany have ...

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Sensor

A sensor is a device that measures a physical quantity and converts it into a signal which can be read by an observer or by an instrument. For example, a mercury thermometer converts the measured temperature into expansion and contraction of a liquid which can be read on a calibrated glass tube. A thermocouple converts temperature to an output voltage which can be read by a voltmeter. For accuracy, all sensors need to be calibrated against known standards.

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