Computer Sciences

Researchers discover machines can learn by simply observing

It is now possible for machines to learn how natural or artificial systems work by simply observing them, without being told what to look for, according to researchers at the University of Sheffield.

Engineering

Successful maiden flight for energy-efficient Flying-V aircraft

This summer, a team of researchers, engineers and a drone pilot of TU Delft traveled to an airbase in Germany for the first real test flight of the scaled flight model of the energy-efficient aircraft design called the Flying-V. ...

Engineering

World's first 3D-printed steel footbridge unveiled by robot

The bridge, which is over four years in the making and is led by Dutch company MX3D, will be a "living laboratory" in Amsterdam's city center. Using its vast network of installed sensors, Imperial College London researchers ...

Robotics

Study examines robotic exoskeletons and bodily fit

A shoddily tailored suit or a shrunken T-shirt may not be the most stylish, but wearing them is unlikely to hurt more than your reputation. An ill-fitting robotic exoskeleton on the battlefield or factory floor, however, ...

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Test cricket

Test cricket is the longest form of the sport of cricket. It has long been considered the ultimate test of playing ability between cricketing nations. It remains the most prestigious form of the game, although the comparatively new One Day International and Twenty20 formats are now more popular amongst some audiences.

The name "Test" may have arisen from the idea that the matches are a "test of strength and competency" between the sides involved. It seems to have been used first to describe an English team that toured Australia in 1861–62, although those matches are not considered Test matches today. The first officially recognised test match commenced on 15 March 1877, contested by England and Australia at the Melbourne Cricket Ground, where Australia won by 45 runs. England won the second ever match (also at the MCG) by four wickets, thus drawing the series 1–1. This was not the first ever international cricket match however, which was played between Canada and the United States, on 24 and 25 of September 1844.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA