Engineering

Fukushima nuclear plant out of space for radioactive water

The utility company operating Fukushima's tsunami-devastated nuclear power plant said Friday it will run out of space to store massive amounts of contaminated water in three years, adding pressure on the government and the ...

Engineering

A wearable device so thin and soft you won't even notice it

Wearable human-machine interfaces—devices that can collect and store important health information about the wearer, among other uses—have benefited from advances in electronics, materials and mechanical designs. But current ...

Engineering

Military researchers see non-lethal role for talking lasers

Say what? Laser plasma balls that can talk? The Pentagon? How, and for what? The answer is that instead of beaming a flashing light or shouting over a loudspeaker to keep people away from sensitive areas, new technology is ...

Engineering

Wearable sensors detect what's in your sweat

Needle pricks not your thing? A team of scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, is developing wearable skin sensors that can detect what's in your sweat.

Engineering

Researchers build hybrid chip able to run autonomous bicycle

A team made up of members from a host of institutions in China, one in Singapore and one in the U.S., has built a hybrid chip that can control an autonomous bicycle. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group ...

Engineering

Soft wearable health monitor uses stretchable electronics

A wireless, wearable monitor built with stretchable electronics could allow comfortable, long-term health monitoring of adults, babies and small children without concern for skin injury or allergic reactions caused by conventional ...

Engineering

Contact lens: You blink and you zoom in

Researchers are in the news this week because of their soft biomimetic lens. Blink twice and you get yourself a closer look at things. Activated soft elastomer works to increase focal length.

Engineering

Barn owls may hold key to navigation and location

The way barn owl brains use sound to locate prey may be a template for electronic directional navigation devices, according to a team of Penn State engineers who are recreating owl brain circuitry in electronics.

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