Telecom

Laser communications: Empowering more data than ever before

Launching this summer, NASA's Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) will showcase the dynamic powers of laser communications technologies. With NASA's ever-increasing human and robotic presence in space, missions ...

Automotive

Congestion pricing could shrink car size

Rush hour will likely return when pandemic lockdowns lift, but a new study suggests that congestion pricing—policies that charge tolls for driving during peak hours—could not only cure traffic jams but also convince motorists ...

Computer Sciences

A new method simulates the universe 1000 times faster

Cosmologists love universe simulations. Even models covering hundreds of millions of light years can be useful for understanding fundamental aspects of cosmology and the early universe. There's just one problem—they're ...

Energy & Green Tech

Scientists report new synapse-like phototransistor

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a breakthrough in energy-efficient phototransistors. Such devices could eventually help computers process visual information ...

Energy & Green Tech

Closing in on state-of-the-art semiconductor solar cells

A synthetic approach that improves absorber layers in perovskite solar cells could help them achieve their full potential and draw closer to the performance of leading gallium arsenide devices.

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Light

Light is electromagnetic radiation, particularly radiation of a wavelength that is visible to the human eye (about 400–700 nm, or perhaps 380–750 nm.) In physics, the term light sometimes refers to electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength, whether visible or not.

Three primary properties of light are:

Light, which exists in tiny "packets" called photons, exhibits properties of both waves and particles. This property is referred to as the wave–particle duality. The study of light, known as optics, is an important research area in modern physics.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA