Energy & Green Tech

Our next renewable energy source could be an artificial leaf

LSU researchers are exploring new ways to use the oldest energy source on our planet—sunlight—to create truly green energy on demand. You've already heard of solar cells and solar panels, but David Vinyard, assistant ...

Energy & Green Tech

Making light work of emerging micropollutants

Carbon-based organic micropollutants in water can be removed by treatment with high-intensity pulses of light in a procedure developed and demonstrated by researchers at KAUST.

Business

Better use of office daylighting can improve people's well-being

A Ph.D. student at EPFL studied the use of automated control systems for blinds and electric lighting to regulate the amount of daylight in an office, and found that such systems can cut a building's energy demand and stimulate ...

Energy & Green Tech

Engineering next generation solar powered batteries

Secondary batteries, such as lithium ion batteries, need to be recharged once the stored energy is used up. In a bid to decrease our dependence on fossil fuels, scientists have been exploring sustainable ways to recharge ...

Engineering

Curve Light: A highly performing indoor positioning system

In recent years, engineers have been trying to develop more effective sensors and tools to monitor indoor environments. Serving as the foundation of these tools, indoor positioning systems automatically determine the position ...

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Light

Light is electromagnetic radiation, particularly radiation of a wavelength that is visible to the human eye (about 400–700 nm, or perhaps 380–750 nm.) In physics, the term light sometimes refers to electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength, whether visible or not.

Three primary properties of light are:

Light, which exists in tiny "packets" called photons, exhibits properties of both waves and particles. This property is referred to as the wave–particle duality. The study of light, known as optics, is an important research area in modern physics.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA