Energy & Green Tech

Perovskite solar modules with a marble look

In the laboratory, perovskite solar cells already reach efficiencies above 25 percent. Compared to silicon solar cells of similar efficiency, the initial materials used in the former case are cheaper and production methods ...

Energy & Green Tech

Breakthrough in converting CO2 into fuel using solar energy

A research team led by Lund University in Sweden has shown how solar power can convert carbon dioxide into fuel, by using advanced materials and ultra-fast laser spectroscopy. The breakthrough could be an important piece ...

Machine learning & AI

Traffic lights controlled using artificial intelligence

Roads are chronically congested and vehicles queue endlessly at junctions. Rush hour is especially bad for long traffic jams. At the Fraunhofer Institute for Optronics, System Technologies and Image Exploitation IOSB, researchers ...

Energy & Green Tech

Our next renewable energy source could be an artificial leaf

LSU researchers are exploring new ways to use the oldest energy source on our planet—sunlight—to create truly green energy on demand. You've already heard of solar cells and solar panels, but David Vinyard, assistant ...

Energy & Green Tech

Making light work of emerging micropollutants

Carbon-based organic micropollutants in water can be removed by treatment with high-intensity pulses of light in a procedure developed and demonstrated by researchers at KAUST.

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Light

Light is electromagnetic radiation, particularly radiation of a wavelength that is visible to the human eye (about 400–700 nm, or perhaps 380–750 nm.) In physics, the term light sometimes refers to electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength, whether visible or not.

Three primary properties of light are:

Light, which exists in tiny "packets" called photons, exhibits properties of both waves and particles. This property is referred to as the wave–particle duality. The study of light, known as optics, is an important research area in modern physics.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA