Computer Sciences

Deep Neural Network aims to improve imaging of cells

Improving the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases like cancer will require more detailed, rapid, and agile imaging technology that can show doctors not just what a specific organ looks like, but also what's happening ...

Robotics

Micromotors push around single cells and particles

A new type of micromotor—powered by ultrasound and steered by magnets—can move around individual cells and microscopic particles in crowded environments without damaging them. The technology could open up new possibilities ...

Engineering

Accounting for variability in vascular models

Scientists at Duke University are working to accurately model the uncertainties in the mechanical behavior of human arterial walls. By supporting theoretical developments for tissue engineering, the research could eventually ...

Computer Sciences

Reconstructing histological slices into 3-D images

Despite advances in 3D imaging such as MRI and CT, scientists still rely on slicing a specimen into 2-D sections to acquire the most detailed information. Using this information, they then try to reconstruct a 3-D image of ...

Engineering

A new era in 3-D printing

In the mid-15th century, a new technology that would change the course of history was invented. Johannes Gutenberg's printing press, with its movable type, promoted the dissemination of information and ideas that is widely ...

Machine learning & AI

Using AI to predict breast cancer and personalize care

Despite major advances in genetics and modern imaging, the diagnosis catches most breast cancer patients by surprise. For some, it comes too late. Later diagnosis means aggressive treatments, uncertain outcomes, and more ...

Engineering

New device paves the way to 3-D-printed organs, food

More than 113,000 people are currently on the national transplant list. And with a shortage of donors, this means that about 20 people will die every day while waiting for an organ, according to the U.S. Department of Health.

Engineering

Rapid magnetic 3-D printing of human cells

Imagine being able to visit your physician, and instead of being given a one-size-fits-all treatment, you are given a specifically customized medication for your symptoms.

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