Engineering

Researchers invent a needle that knows where to go

Syringes and hollow needles have been used to deliver medication for more than a century. However, the precise implementation of these devices depends on the operator, and it can be difficult to deliver medication to delicate ...

Engineering

New 3-D printer can create complex biological tissues

A UCLA Samueli-led team has developed a specially adapted 3-D printer to build therapeutic biomaterials from multiple materials. The advance could be a step toward on-demand printing of complex artificial tissues for use ...

Engineering

Researchers develop portable 3-D skin printer to repair deep wounds

University of Toronto researchers have developed a handheld 3-D skin printer that deposits even layers of skin tissue to cover and heal deep wounds. The team believes it to be the first device that forms tissue in situ, depositing ...

Robotics

Smaller, smarter, softer robotic arm for endoscopic surgery

Flexible endoscopes can snake through narrow passages to treat difficult to reach areas of the body. However, once they arrive at their target, these devices rely on rigid surgical tools to manipulate or remove tissue. These ...

Engineering

Researchers grow heart tissue on spinach leaves

Researchers face a fundamental challenge as they seek to scale up human tissue regeneration from small lab samples to full-size tissues, bones, even whole organs to implant in people to treat disease or traumatic injuries: ...

Robotics

Biomedical researchers suggest using robots to grow human tissue

(Tech Xplore)—A pair of biomedical researchers with Oxford University is suggesting that human-like robots might provide the best platform for growing tissue to be transplanted into human patients. In a recent issue of ...

Engineering

Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties

The human heart beats more than 2.5 billion times in an average lifetime. Now scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart's amazing biomechanical properties.

Engineering

3-D printing produces cartilage from strands of bioink

Strands of cow cartilage substitute for ink in a 3D bioprinting process that may one day create cartilage patches for worn out joints, according to a team of engineers. "Our goal is to create tissue that can be used to replace ...

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