Computer Sciences

This algorithm has opinions about your face

When two people meet, they instantly size each other up, making snap judgments about everything from the other person's age to their intelligence or trustworthiness based solely on the way they look. Those first impressions, ...

Machine learning & AI

New algorithm could simplify decisions for ship channel dredging

A new decision-support tool could become a game changer in the dredging of ship channels. Millions of dollars are at stake every time a major ship channel is cleaned up. Delays in dredging can cost even more by triggering ...

Computer Sciences

New AI algorithms for cost-effective medical image diagnostics

Medical imaging is an important part of modern healthcare, enhancing both the precision, reliability and development of treatment for various diseases. Artificial intelligence has also been widely used to further enhance ...

Computer Sciences

How keywords can hack the hiring process

An assistant professor of computer science and engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington has found that job applicants can improve their position, on average, by at least 16 spots on a pool of 100 applicants by ...

Computer Sciences

Algorithms inspired by nature sustain wireless sensor networks

Wireless sensor networks have many applications in environmental monitoring, safety and control monitoring of industrial processes, in healthcare, and in disaster management. To be effective the devices, the sensors, must ...

Internet

Bot can spot depressed Twitter users in 9 out of 10 cases

A newly developed algorithm can spot depression in Twitter users with 88.39% accuracy. Developed by researchers at Brunel University London and the University of Leicester, the algorithm determines someone's mental state ...

Engineering

With a whiff, 'e-nose' can sense fine whiskey

Scotch or Irish, single malt or blended? While a whiskey enthusiast might be able to distinguish the good stuff from run-of-the-mill by smell alone, most tipplers rely on the label, black or otherwise.

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Algorithm

In mathematics, computing, linguistics, and related subjects, an algorithm is a finite sequence of instructions, an explicit, step-by-step procedure for solving a problem, often used for calculation and data processing. It is formally a type of effective method in which a list of well-defined instructions for completing a task, will when given an initial state, proceed through a well-defined series of successive states, eventually terminating in an end-state. The transition from one state to the next is not necessarily deterministic; some algorithms, known as probabilistic algorithms, incorporate randomness.

A partial formalization of the concept began with attempts to solve the Entscheidungsproblem (the "decision problem") posed by David Hilbert in 1928. Subsequent formalizations were framed as attempts to define "effective calculability" (Kleene 1943:274) or "effective method" (Rosser 1939:225); those formalizations included the Gödel-Herbrand-Kleene recursive functions of 1930, 1934 and 1935, Alonzo Church's lambda calculus of 1936, Emil Post's "Formulation 1" of 1936, and Alan Turing's Turing machines of 1936–7 and 1939.

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