Robotics

Rubbery camouflage skin exhibits smart and stretchy behaviors

The skin of cephalopods, such as octopuses, squids and cuttlefish, is stretchy and smart, contributing to these creatures' ability to sense and respond to their surroundings. A Penn State-led collaboration has harnessed these ...

Robotics

Scientists craft living human skin for robots

From action heroes to villainous assassins, biohybrid robots made of both living and artificial materials have been at the center of many sci-fi fantasies, inspiring today's robotic innovations. It's still a long way until ...

Robotics

Introducing GTGraffiti: The robot that paints like a human

Graduate students at the Georgia Institute of Technology have built the first graffiti-painting robot system that mimics the fluidity of human movement. Aptly named GTGraffiti, the system uses motion capture technology to ...

Energy & Green Tech

Sponge-like solar cells could be basis for better pacemakers

Holes help make sponges and English muffins useful (and, in the case of the latter, delicious). Without holes, they wouldn't be flexible enough to bend into small crevices, or to sop up the perfect amount of jam and butter.

Consumer & Gadgets

An edible QR code takes a shot at fake whiskey

In the future, when you order a shot of whiskey, you might ask the bartender to hold an edible fluorescent silk tag that could be found floating inside—even though it is safe to consume.

Energy & Green Tech

New 'fabric' converts motion into electricity

Scientists at NTU Singapore have developed a stretchable and waterproof "fabric" that turns energy generated from body movements into electrical energy.

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